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The Shannon Elizabeth Foundation is proud to partner with Relate Bracelets with this, our first in a series of bracelets.  All proceeds from sales go to our various programs and initiatives. The bracelet is designed with collaboration in mind, and we invite you to partner with us in selling them as an opportunity to further your own philanthropic fundraising, or to profit directly from their sale – the choice is yours. THE THREAD THAT CONNECTS US Relate Bracelets is a
The illicit demand for their horns and other body parts has pushed rhino populations in both Africa and Asia to the brink of extinction. In northeastern India, though, one father-daughter team is hoping another rhino product could help save the species: its dung. The illicit demand for their horns and other body parts has pushed rhino populations in both Africa and Asia to the brink of extinction. In northeastern India, though, one father-daughter team is hoping another rhino product could
In 2015, American actress, Shannon Elizabeth Fadal, had made a whirlwind visit to Zimbabwe and South Africa to hand over donations raised in the US for projects here in Africa. Her mission was twofold, however, as just as important to her was to be in Africa to learn first hand about how she could make a meaningful, practical contribution to conservation efforts, especially regarding the havoc wrought by the poaching crisis. Personal and professional commitments had taken her back to
That Africa draws people to it is undeniable – every year hundreds of thousands of visitors from all over the world touch down somewhere on this astoundingly rich and diverse continent. For many it is for the holiday of a lifetime, a chance to immerse themselves in its primal landscapes; among ancient cultures and a diversity of life unmatched anywhere else. For some it is the start of a love affair with the continent and repeat visits throughout their lives.
African elephants are big animals with big needs and move daily around the savanna in their endless quest for food and water. We know that they can cover a lot of ground in a surprisingly short time, but do they really migrate? A new study from the Conservation Ecology Research Unit (CERU) at the University of Pretoria set out to unravel migration in the world’s largest terrestrial mammal. Elephants migrate despite protected area boundaries and international borders IFAW | 30
Moving wildlife from one area to another is a widely used strategy in conservation management, not only in Africa but in many other regions as well. Only in Africa, though, are the largest of all mammals moved over great distances. The latest episode underway is the translocation of 200 elephants halfway across southern Africa. The move is not without risk, but at the helm of this complex logistical process is the hugely experienced and competent African Parks organisation. A gigantic